Art History: The Music-Image: Closing the (methodological) gap between Music(ology) and Film (Studies) – School of Literature, Art and Media Art History: The Music-Image: Closing the (methodological) gap between Music(ology) and Film (Studies) – School of Literature, Art and Media

Art History: The Music-Image: Closing the (methodological) gap between Music(ology) and Film (Studies)

Presenter: Will Jeffery

‘What is film music and how should it be analysed? Film Music Studies has a problematic history that has separated the analysis of music from the image due to the opposing methodologies of Musicology and Film Studies. This paper discovers a new way of thinking about film music, called the ‘music-image’. The music-image is the semiotic ambiguity that interlocks ‘music’ and ‘image’ through time, analysing a whole image with no fixed meaning or communication, bridging the methodologies of musicology and film studies to do so. This philosophical and theoretical model avoids any top-down ‘grand theory’ as the music-image needs the experience of the spectator and cinema to exist, as any film music needs cinema to exist. In this paper, the methodologies of musicology and film studies are bridged to explore the music-image as one ‘whole’ image, using examples including Jaws (Spielberg, 1975), Alexander Nevsky (Eisenstein, 1938), and The Hours (Daldry, 2002).’

Will Jeffery is a PhD student in Film Studies at The University of Sydney, currently researching a new method for analysing film music, titled ‘The Music-Image’. As well as film music, Jeffery is interested in a wide range of film-related topics including: Hollywood, European, and early Soviet cinema, the films of Ingmar Bergman, Dziga Vertov and Steven Spielberg, and the evolution of visual effects.

This event will be held online via Zoom.


Upcoming seminars this semester:

1 April
Sophie Hopmeier, “Men of the Space Age Meet Men of the Stone Age: Mnemotechnologies and Temporal Disorientation in the Films of the Musée de l’Homme”

15 April
Rachel Skokowski, “Monkeys & Mechanical Arts: The Goncourt Brothers and the 19th-century Etching Revival”

29 April
Anna Arabindan-Kesson, “Black Bodies, White Gold: Cotton, Race and Representation in the United States”

6 May
Lorraine Kypiotis, “Lucien Henry, Alexander Murray and the Australian Ethos” Raha Shahidi, “Boucher and the Moliere Illustrations”

13 May
Nina Stromqvist, “The Border, taking the ancient Nordic tradition of allemansrätten or ‘everyman’s right’ as a conceptual proposition”

27 May
Mimi Kelly, “New Refractions of Self: Social Media and the Digital Woman”

3 June
Diana Reynolds, “Religious Foundations as Second Voices: The Victoria Contemporary Figurative Artist, 1848-1870”

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Date

Mar 18 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

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