Art History: Photography at the Event Horizon / Contemporary art from Sápmi – School of Literature, Art and Media Art History: Photography at the Event Horizon / Contemporary art from Sápmi – School of Literature, Art and Media

Art History: Photography at the Event Horizon / Contemporary art from Sápmi

The Visible and the Invisible: Photography at the Event Horizon

Presenter: Yvette Hamilton

Abstract: The Visible and the Invisible: Photography at the Event Horizon uses the recent first-ever image of a black hole as an aperture to view the transit of the photographic medium. The current era of the algorithmic turn within the photographic medium is one that is characterised by the non-ocular. Instead of the lone photographer leaning their eye against a viewfinder to frame a view through their camera, algorithmic imaging takes multiple views from image data sets that are fed through algorithms in a blind process in order to see. Whilst this may seem to be a whole new realm of photography, this paper argues that this relationship between the ocular and the non-ocular and the human and the non-human has been inherent within the photographic medium from its earliest incarnations.

Yvette Hamilton is an interdisciplinary artist and academic whose work explores the evolving medium of photography and vision in the current post-photographic era. Exploring the unseen and the unphotographable, at a time when everything is seen and photographed, her practice sits at the edges of the photographic medium and explores the way that it shapes human vision and its relationship to the real. She is Associate Lecturer in Photography and Moving Image at UNSW Art and Design and a current PhD candidate at the University of Sydney. Her ongoing practice-led doctoral thesis, entitled: Photography and the Black Hole: the Appearance and Disappearance of a Medium aligns pre and post photographic eras to the phenomena of black holes

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Marja Helander, Britta Marakatt and the ‘border’ in contemporary art from Sápmi

Presenter: Nina Stromqvist

Abstract: This paper explores the Sámi-Finnish film Eatnanvuloš lottit  (Birds in the Earth), 2018 by Marja Helander, and its aesthetic and conceptual proximities to Historja (2003-2017), by Sámi-Swedish artist Britta Marakatt-Labba. My practice-led research takes the ancient Nordic tradition of allemansrätten or ‘everyman’s right’ as a conceptual proposition. From here, I discuss the ‘border’ in relation to contemporary art practices of Scandinavian, citing art historical traditions from the Nordic region, while positioning first nations art practice as a strategy to de-centre and de-stabilise these familiar tropes.

Nina Stromqvist is an independent curator and art historian. She is doing a Practice-Led PhD (Curating) in the Department of Art History at the University of Sydney.

This event will be held online via Zoom.

Art History Seminar Programme going forward:

4 November – Peter McNeil, “Fashion beyond clothing: the visual culture of Eurasian porcelain, glass and painted mirrors, 1500-1800”

11 November – Bruce Isaacs, “Literary and Cinematic Archi-Textualities: Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue

 

Image credits: 

Supermassive black hole from the galaxy Messier 87, captured April 2019. Event Horizon collaboration. Source: https://cdn.eso.org/images/publicationjpg/eso1907a.jpg accessed 25th September, 2021.

Still from Eatnanvuloš lottit  (Birds in the Earth), 2018, by Marja Helander

Date

Oct 21 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

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