Art History: Social Media and the Digital Woman & VNS Matrix and the Passage from Counterculture to Cyberculture – School of Literature, Art and Media Art History: Social Media and the Digital Woman & VNS Matrix and the Passage from Counterculture to Cyberculture – School of Literature, Art and Media

Art History: Social Media and the Digital Woman & VNS Matrix and the Passage from Counterculture to Cyberculture

New Refractions of Self: Social Media and the Digital Woman

Presenter: Mimi Kelly

Within social media, identity as an ideological symbol has become a powerful form of distilled social currency. In this context, dominant fiefdoms of ‘types’ are increasingly crystallised and harnessed as a form of commodification, including self- commodification. While value signalling may shift dramatically from promoters of beauty ‘ideals’, to wholesome influences or champions of bodily difference for instance, there is a unified attention to the crafting of self as a strategic spectacle. The paper selects one case study to consider the semiotics conveyed, the role of digital photography, and what productive or reductive capacities the social exchange of the digital self can instigate between viewers/creators and offer creators individually (via the looped gaze).

Mimi Kelly is a sessional teacher within the Department of Art History. She completed her PhD ‘Fashion, Beauty and the Erotic Female Grotesque’ in 2019 through Sydney College of the Arts.

Saboteurs of Big Daddy Mainframe:
VNS Matrix and the Passage from Counterculture to Cyberculture

Presenter: Nicholas Croggon

In the dominant account of cyberculture, the Internet of the 1990s marked the coming-to- power of a type of US liberalism that fused information technology, and the figure of the universal, disembodied, human subject. This paper proposes an alternative formulation of cyberculture, one that found expression in the work of Australian cyberfeminist collective, VNS Matrix, and which drew on a different genealogy of countercultural practices, from NY video activism to Sydney lesbian sex
radicalism.

Nicholas Croggon is a PhD candidate at Columbia University, where he is writing a thesis on video art in the United States in the 1970s. He is the co-founder with Helen Hughes of Discipline journal, and the Events and Programs Officers at the Power Institute.

This event will be held online via Zoom.


Upcoming seminars this semester:

3 June
Diana Reynolds, “Religious Foundations as Second Voices: The Victoria Contemporary Figurative Artist, 1848-1870”

Date

May 27 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

More Info

Join via Zoom

Location

Via Zoom
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