English Seminar: The ironic hero and the beloved villain: ambivalence in Charlotte Brontë’s ‘The Professor’ and Emily Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ – School of Literature, Art and Media English Seminar: The ironic hero and the beloved villain: ambivalence in Charlotte Brontë’s ‘The Professor’ and Emily Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ – School of Literature, Art and Media

English Seminar: The ironic hero and the beloved villain: ambivalence in Charlotte Brontë’s ‘The Professor’ and Emily Brontë’s ‘Wuthering Heights’

Stephanie Last, ‘The ironic hero and the beloved villain: ambivalence in Charlotte Brontë’s The Professor and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights.’ 

Abstract: The protagonists in The Professor and Wuthering Heights are conflicted, highly ambivalent characters. Existing in the liminal space between villainy and heroism, these characters evade straightforward categorisation and provoke mixed feelings, and thus readers are forced into a state of critical and affective uncertainty. Drawing on Freud’s theories about ambivalence and the problematic of internal polarity, as well as the notions of reading and misreading, this paper will scrutinise the tension of opposites that is central to both of these Brontëan novels.

Biography: Stephanie Last is a PhD candidate in the English department at USYD. Her research centres on the psychology of villainy in the Victorian novel, with a focus on reading character at the critical-affective nexus.


Venue

This event will be held online via Zoom.
University staff and students can join the event in the Woolley Common Room, Level 4, John Woolley Building (A20).

Contact: Liam Semler (liam.semler@sydney.edu.au).

 

Upcoming seminars

24 March Belinda Castles, ‘How to Build a Glass Church: Peter Carey’s Oscar and Lucinda
31 March Danielle Celermajer, ‘Writing Climate Catastrophe: The Challenge of Representation, Ethics and Politics’
21 April Nick Riemer, ‘The Politics of Disruption and the Functions of Speech’
12 May Stephanie Last, ‘The Ironic Hero and the Beloved Villain: Ambivalence in Charlotte Brontë’s The Professor and Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights
2 June Sue Woolfe, ‘On Waiting Upon: Speculations by an Australian Novelist on the Experience of Writing a Commissioned Novel’
9 June Isabelle Hesse, ‘Critical Relationality: Relational Histories between Europe and the Middle East Since 1987’

Date

May 12 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

More Info

Join via Zoom

Location

Via Zoom
Join via Zoom

Comments are closed.