Performance Studies: Embodied experience of flamenco dance / Being, doing and performing intersectionality – School of Literature, Art and Media Performance Studies: Embodied experience of flamenco dance / Being, doing and performing intersectionality – School of Literature, Art and Media

Performance Studies: Embodied experience of flamenco dance / Being, doing and performing intersectionality

Leisurely seeking duende: Meaning making through the embodied experience of flamenco dance

My PhD project is investigating the experience of dancing flamenco for leisure in Australia. I am looking at the connections between the physical, technical, creative, and expressive elements of practising flamenco dance and how they add value and meaning to individuals in their daily lives. In this presentation I will share some of the emerging themes from the 15 interviews with students and teachers of flamenco dance that I have conducted in my field work thus far. These conversations with the dancers were informed by my autoethnographic research where I have been recording my own experiences learning flamenco dance at various schools in Sydney.

Lillian Jean Shaddick is a second year PhD student at the University of Sydney in the Theatre and Performance Studies Department where she also completed her Bachelors in Sociology and Performance Studies and her Master of Arts by research degree. While she is currently investigating flamenco dance, she has also published on the commercialisation and appropriation of Brazilian samba no pé in Australia, which was the topic of her master’s research. Lillian is a member of the PoP Moves (Performance of the Popular) Australasia research group and practices a range of dance styles both professionally and leisurely.

‘Being, doing and performing intersectionality’

This piece of work is a first draft of the introduction of my thesis. My thesis asks questions about: Does performance of an intersectional identity mesh with performativity of an intersectional identity? How does performance of intersectional identity mesh with special events? What opportunities are granted through performance and through special events, to perform intersectionality? Therefore, a key theoretical framework focuses on the politics of intersectionality since its conception in the 1980s. I will be offering a brief genealogy and also suggesting some of the ways in which my thesis needs to problematise this.

Hayden Moon is a PhD candidate in Theatre and Performance Studies at the University of Sydney, a Pinnacle Foundation Scholar and a competitive Irish dancer. He works as an advocate for the LGBTQIA+, disabled and First Nations communities through his roles in various collectives and organisations such as ACON, First Nations Rainbow and The LGBTI Health Alliance. In 2020, Hayden was awarded the Out For The Next Generation – Student of the Year award in Out For Australia’s 30 Under 30 Awards.

Online via Zoom. To register, please email glen.mcgillivray@sydney.edu.au.

 

Date

Jun 04 2021
Expired!

Time

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Location

Via Zoom

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