Art History: Men of the Space Age Meet Men of the Stone Age

Men of the Space Age Meet Men of the Stone Age: Mnemotechnologies and Temporal Disorientation in the Musée de l’Homme and its films This paper explores the capacity of film to mediate paradoxical visions of the unity of mankind. I do so by examining how cinema destabilised linear temporalities of evolution, technicity, and ‘progress’ which …

Art History: Black Apollo: Aesthetics, Dissection and Race in Joseph Maclise’s Surgical Anatomy

  Presenter: Keren Hammerschlag This talk is concerned with the complex relationship between aesthetics and race in nineteenth-century anatomical illustration, with a focus on Joseph Maclise’s 1851 anatomical atlas, Surgical Anatomy. Maclise’s atlas contains several unusual illustrations of the dissection of a Black man, prompting an interrogation of the racial identities of those who ended …

Art History: Black Apollo: Aesthetics, Dissection and Race in Joseph Maclise’s Surgical Anatomy

  Presenter: Keren Hammerschlag This talk is concerned with the complex relationship between aesthetics and race in nineteenth-century anatomical illustration, with a focus on Joseph Maclise’s 1851 anatomical atlas, Surgical Anatomy. Maclise’s atlas contains several unusual illustrations of the dissection of a Black man, prompting an interrogation of the racial identities of those who ended …

Art History: Modularity and Collectivism in Ceramic Installations by Liu Jianhua and Cai Guo-Qiang

  Presenter: Alex Burchmore German art historian Lothar Ledderose has identified modularity as a defining feature of Chinese material culture, describing seven key indicators of this trait in his Ten Thousand Things: Module and Mass Production in Chinese Art (2000): quantity, interchangeability, division of labour, additive growth, standardisation, proportional scale, and the creation of the new from the …

Art History Scholars Forum: Museums as sites of civil society

Museums as sites of civil society: Conversations with audience in the 21st century Chiara O’Reilly, Anna Lawrenson, Lee-Anne Hall Public Museums are sites of civil society that operate in a unique compact with the state on behalf of citizens to collect, hold, exhibit and narrate human endeavour and history. In serving ‘society’ however, they both …

Art History Scholars Forum: At Home in the World

At Home in the World Chair Kathleen Davidson. Contributions by: Donna Brett, Kathleen Davidson, Mark De Vitis, Mary Roberts This scholars’ forum brings together a number of researchers in the Department to explore representations of home in visual or material culture and engage with the concept of being at home in the world. Themes to …

Art History Research Seminar

The world is our friend for such a short time: the significance of the dead in representations of The Triumph of Death in Trecento Italy Presenter: Stephanie Swanson My PhD investigates the Triumph of Death, a popular theme in fourteenth century Italian art. This macabre iconography always depicts a slaughter committed by a personified figure …

Art History: Fish-Eye Points of View and Modern Culture

Presenter: Ann Elias The paper explores early 20th century aquatic science, the optics of underwater space, popular culture, and surrealism. Discussed are links between exquisite corpse and underwater refraction and between surreality and underwater distortions that happen at the interface of water and air. The paper addresses scientific interest in the puzzle of whether humans …

Art History: Space, time, and the limits of painting in the early work of Vija Celmins

  Presenter: Andrew Ward Best-known for her meticulous depictions of barren desert surfaces, ridging ocean swells, and inestimable night skies, Vija Celmins (born 1938) commenced her career in the artistic context of 1960s Los Angeles. Turning inward to the space of her Venice Beach studio during the early 1960s, Celmins’ early paintings constitute careful studies …