Media@Sydney: Myths, Mistakes, and #FakeNews: A Historical Perspective

Fake news has existed since the dawn of modern journalism. Yet the term itself largely entered the popular lexicon only in the last decade. For all the public discussion of fake news, an agreed-upon definition, and a general understanding of the phenomenon, has largely escaped consensus. Is fake news any erroneous information delivered with an …

Media@Sydney: Automating the Social: Digital Futures for Welfare, Disability, Social, and Health Services

Automating the Social: Digital Futures for Welfare, Disability, Social, and Health Services In recent years, we have seen the rise of automation, and associated developments in digital technology, data, and AI, being imagined and deployed to reshape the face of welfare, disability, health, and social services. Major programs in governments departments such Social Security and …

Media@Sydney: Digital Knowledge Resources in the Caribbean and Pacific

From YouTube to Talanoa: Digital Knowledge Resources in the Caribbean and Pacific Theories of learning in and through digital media have largely drawn upon research in Western contexts such as the US and UK. Yet, as sociocultural learning theory has demonstrated, context often requires a re-thinking of the spaces and practices of learning. This seminar …

Media@Sydney: Communicative Reflexivity and Financial Bubbles: Linking Minsky to Marx

Please join us for a Media@Sydney seminar on ‘Communicative Reflexivity and Financial Bubbles: Linking Minsky to Marx’. In his lecture, Peter Thompson, Victoria University of Wellington, will outline a communicative framework for understanding the reflexive, constitutive role of financial information in the generation and annihilation of financial bubbles. In contrast to the neoclassical economic notion …

Media@Sydney: Digital Media and Adolescents’ Political Engagement

With their fundamentally different information seeking behavior compared to older cohorts, adolescents’ interest in traditional news and in institutional politics has decreased constantly over the past decades. Especially social media have fundamentally changed adolescents’ ways of interacting with their environment. Using smartphones, they are permanently connected to the world and their peers. This poses opportunities …