Linguistics: Does language hit the beat?

Does language hit the beat? Studying linguistic rhythm by means of sensorimotor synchronisation Dr Tamara Rathcke, University of Kent Abstract For decades, the concept of rhythm in language has been controversially debated (Roach 1982, Cummins 2012). There is a great deal of disagreement on the unit, the definition, the study method and the sheer existence …

Indigenous Languages of the Himalayas

The Thousand Tongues in the Heart of Asia: Indigenous Languages of the Himalayas Spread across five countries in the heart of Asia, the Himalayas are home to hundreds of languages, and are one our world’s major centers of linguistic diversity. Come join us at this special event as part of the International Year of Indigenous …

Linguistics: Quantifying clause chains: Genreconnected syntax in Nungon

Quantifying clause chains: Genre-connected  syntax in Nungon Hannah Sarvasy, Western Sydney University One of the ways that clause chains differ from English sentences is their potential number of coordinated clauses: over 100 clauses in a single chain are attested. But there has been no systematic study of clause chain length in a small corpus for any …

Linguistics: Intonation Matters: A prosodic phonological analysis of a courtroom discourse

Richard Yuan, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies Intonation Matters: A prosodic phonological analysis of a courtroom discourse Abstract: Have you ever seen a prosecutor bullying a defendant or other (expert) witnesses by manipulating tones (and other linguistic or paralinguistic resources) in a courtroom trial? This talk presents a prosodic phonological analysis of such courtroom discourse …

Linguistics Workshop: Language, Genes and Prehistory

Language, genes and prehistory: A One-Day Interdisciplinary Workshop Linguistics and genetics have traditionally pursued different approaches to the reconstruction of human prehistories, applying different methods and often working at different time-scales (Blench, Ross and Sanchez-Mazas 2008). In recent years, however, research has emerged which attempts a direct correlation of linguistic and genetic indicators of population …

Linguistics: How tea changed China and how China changed tea

Public Lecture Followed by Book Launch How tea changed China and how China changed tea China owes her very existence to tea. During the late Táng and the Sòng dynasty periods, China traded tea with Tibet, the Tangut kingdom and the Uighur khaganate in order to secure horses for her cavalry. Chinese horsemen never became …

Linguistics Seminar: Audio-visual facilitation of children’s speech processing

Audio-visual facilitation of children’s speech processing Rebecca Holt Macquarie University Processing speech input can be a slow and effortful task for children, and this is exaggerated among children who suffer from hearing loss. This speech processing difficulty can adversely affect their academic achievement and psychosocial wellbeing. Presenting visual speech cues (e.g., the speaker’s facial movements) with …

Linguistics seminar: Oral examinations in a tertiary Spanish Law course

Margarita Vidal, Pontifical Catholic University, Chile Exploring field in ‘social science’ (?): Oral examinations in a tertiary Spanish Law course This presentation investigates how field is construed in formal oral assessments in a first-year course in an undergraduate degree in Law in a Spanish-speaking context. The research was undertaken as part of a collaborative pedagogic …

Lexis-grammar complementarity and person: a cross-linguistic study

This week’s seminar will be presented by Pin Wang from Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The linguistic category of person identifies, tracks and differentiates participant roles in discourse. Person in this study focuses on the linguistic resources involved in identifying people in discourse across languages, which involve a complex series of choices in relation to discourse …